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South Carolina, Marion

Hurricane Statement

Statement as of 2:37 PM EDT on May 28, 2016

Expires 5:00 PM EDT on May 28, 2016


This product covers southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina

**tropical depression two will approach the central South
Carolina coast this afternoon and evening and may briefly
strengthen to a weak tropical storm before landfall on Sunday
morning**

New information
---------------

* changes to watches and warnings:
    - none

* current watches and warnings:
    - a Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect for inland
      Horry... coastal Horry... inland Georgetown and coastal Georgetown

* storm information:
    - about 260 miles south-southwest of Wilmington NC or about 210
      miles south of Myrtle Beach SC
    - 30.7n 79.0w
    - storm intensity 35 mph
    - movement northwest or 310 degrees at 13 mph

Situation overview
------------------

Tropical Depression Two, located about 260 miles south-southwest of Myrtle
Beach, is forecast to strengthen into a weak tropical storm as it
approaches the South Carolina coast. Landfall is predicted near
Charleston on Sunday morning. The system is expected to turn to
the northeast later Sunday while weakening and then slowly move
along the South Carolina and North Carolina coastlines Monday through
Wednesday.

Rainfall over the next few days should average 1 to 3 inches. A few
locations may receive as much as 4 inches.

Sustained winds of 25 to 35 mph with gusts up to 50 mph are
expected to spread across Georgetown and southern Horry counties.
Elsewhere winds will range from 10 to 20 mph, with gusts to 30 mph
along the coast. No significant impacts from winds are expected
outside of the Tropical Storm Warning area.

Rough surf and an increased danger of strong rip currents can be
expected through Sunday along the entire coast from Georgetown
County northward to Pender County.

Potential impacts
-----------------

* flooding rain:
protect against locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible
limited impacts across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina. Potential impacts include:
    - localized flooding from rainfall may occur, especially in
      low-lying and poor drainage areas. Some rivers and creeks may
      rise as a result of the rain. Small streams, creeks, and
      ditches may overflow in some locations.
    - Several storm drains and retention ponds may become full and
      begin to overflow. Some brief Road closures are possible.

* Wind:
protect against hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across
southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina. Potential
impacts include:
    - damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored
      Mobile homes is possible. Unsecured lightweight objects may be
      blown about.
    - Some large limbs may break from trees. A few shallow rooted or
      weak trees may snap or be knocked down. Some fences and roadway
      signs damaged.
    - A few roads may become impassable due to debris, particularly
      within urban or heavily wooded locations. Hazardous driving
      conditions are possible, especially for high profile vehicles
      on bridges and other elevated roadways.
    - Scattered power and communications outages are possible.

* Surge:
protect against locally hazardous surge having possible limited
impacts across northeast South Carolina. Potential impacts in
this area include:
    - localized inundation and minor over-wash is possible, mainly
      along immediate shorelines and other vulnerable low-lying areas
      along the coast. Low spots along waterways and tidal creeks may
      also be impacted.
    - Some portions of near-shore roads and parking lots may become
      covered by surge water. Driving conditions may become hazardous
      in places where the surge covers the Road.
    - Minor to moderate beach erosion is possible, mainly in vulnerable
      locations along the ocean front.
    - Minor damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers is
      possible. A few small craft may break away from moorings if not
      properly secured.
    - Navigation may be difficult near inlets and waterways, as
      navigational aids may be off station or missing.

Elsewhere across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina, little to no impact is anticipated.

* Tornadoes:
protect against a tornado event having possible limited impacts
across coastal Georgetown and Horry counties. Potential impacts include:
    - the occurrence of isolated tornadoes can hinder the execution
      of emergency plans during tropical events.
    - A few places may experience tornado damage, along with power
      and communications disruptions.
    - Tornadoes can cause damage to trees, vehicles, boats, and
      buildings. Unsecured Mobile homes and poorly constructed
      structures are particularly vulnerable.

Elsewhere across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina, little to no impact is anticipated.

Precautionary/preparedness actions
----------------------------------

* other preparedness information:
now is the time to bring to completion all preparations to protect
life and property in accordance with your emergency plan.

Outside preparations should be wrapped up as soon as possible before
weather conditions deteriorate.

Always heed the advice of local officials and comply with any
orders that are issued. Remember, during the storm 9 1 1 emergency
services may not be able to immediately respond if conditions are
unsafe. This should be a big factor in your decision making.

Check-in with your emergency points of contact among family, friends,
and workmates. Inform them of your status and well-being. Let them
know how you intend to ride out the storm and when you plan to
check-in again.

In emergencies it is best to remain calm. Stay informed and focused
on the situation at hand. Exercise patience with those you encounter.
Be a good samaritan and helpful to others.

If you are a visitor and still in the area, listen for the name of
the city or town in which you are staying within local news updates.
Be sure you know the name of the County in which it
resides. Pay attention for instructions from local authorities.

Closely monitor NOAA Weather Radio or other local news outlets for
official storm information. Be ready to adapt to possible changes to
the forecast.

* Additional sources of information:
- for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov
- for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org
- for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org

Next update
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in Wilmington NC around 6 PM EDT, or sooner if conditions
warrant.


Kreitner


237 PM EDT Sat may 28 2016

This product covers southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina

**tropical depression two will approach the central South
Carolina coast this afternoon and evening and may briefly
strengthen to a weak tropical storm before landfall on Sunday
morning**

New information
---------------

* changes to watches and warnings:
    - none

* current watches and warnings:
    - a Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect for inland
      Horry... coastal Horry... inland Georgetown and coastal Georgetown

* storm information:
    - about 260 miles south-southwest of Wilmington NC or about 210
      miles south of Myrtle Beach SC
    - 30.7n 79.0w
    - storm intensity 35 mph
    - movement northwest or 310 degrees at 13 mph

Situation overview
------------------

Tropical Depression Two, located about 260 miles south-southwest of Myrtle
Beach, is forecast to strengthen into a weak tropical storm as it
approaches the South Carolina coast. Landfall is predicted near
Charleston on Sunday morning. The system is expected to turn to
the northeast later Sunday while weakening and then slowly move
along the South Carolina and North Carolina coastlines Monday through
Wednesday.

Rainfall over the next few days should average 1 to 3 inches. A few
locations may receive as much as 4 inches.

Sustained winds of 25 to 35 mph with gusts up to 50 mph are
expected to spread across Georgetown and southern Horry counties.
Elsewhere winds will range from 10 to 20 mph, with gusts to 30 mph
along the coast. No significant impacts from winds are expected
outside of the Tropical Storm Warning area.

Rough surf and an increased danger of strong rip currents can be
expected through Sunday along the entire coast from Georgetown
County northward to Pender County.

Potential impacts
-----------------

* flooding rain:
protect against locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible
limited impacts across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina. Potential impacts include:
    - localized flooding from rainfall may occur, especially in
      low-lying and poor drainage areas. Some rivers and creeks may
      rise as a result of the rain. Small streams, creeks, and
      ditches may overflow in some locations.
    - Several storm drains and retention ponds may become full and
      begin to overflow. Some brief Road closures are possible.

* Wind:
protect against hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across
southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina. Potential
impacts include:
    - damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored
      Mobile homes is possible. Unsecured lightweight objects may be
      blown about.
    - Some large limbs may break from trees. A few shallow rooted or
      weak trees may snap or be knocked down. Some fences and roadway
      signs damaged.
    - A few roads may become impassable due to debris, particularly
      within urban or heavily wooded locations. Hazardous driving
      conditions are possible, especially for high profile vehicles
      on bridges and other elevated roadways.
    - Scattered power and communications outages are possible.

* Surge:
protect against locally hazardous surge having possible limited
impacts across northeast South Carolina. Potential impacts in
this area include:
    - localized inundation and minor over-wash is possible, mainly
      along immediate shorelines and other vulnerable low-lying areas
      along the coast. Low spots along waterways and tidal creeks may
      also be impacted.
    - Some portions of near-shore roads and parking lots may become
      covered by surge water. Driving conditions may become hazardous
      in places where the surge covers the Road.
    - Minor to moderate beach erosion is possible, mainly in vulnerable
      locations along the ocean front.
    - Minor damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers is
      possible. A few small craft may break away from moorings if not
      properly secured.
    - Navigation may be difficult near inlets and waterways, as
      navigational aids may be off station or missing.

Elsewhere across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina, little to no impact is anticipated.

* Tornadoes:
protect against a tornado event having possible limited impacts
across coastal Georgetown and Horry counties. Potential impacts include:
    - the occurrence of isolated tornadoes can hinder the execution
      of emergency plans during tropical events.
    - A few places may experience tornado damage, along with power
      and communications disruptions.
    - Tornadoes can cause damage to trees, vehicles, boats, and
      buildings. Unsecured Mobile homes and poorly constructed
      structures are particularly vulnerable.

Elsewhere across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina, little to no impact is anticipated.

Precautionary/preparedness actions
----------------------------------

* other preparedness information:
now is the time to bring to completion all preparations to protect
life and property in accordance with your emergency plan.

Outside preparations should be wrapped up as soon as possible before
weather conditions deteriorate.

Always heed the advice of local officials and comply with any
orders that are issued. Remember, during the storm 9 1 1 emergency
services may not be able to immediately respond if conditions are
unsafe. This should be a big factor in your decision making.

Check-in with your emergency points of contact among family, friends,
and workmates. Inform them of your status and well-being. Let them
know how you intend to ride out the storm and when you plan to
check-in again.

In emergencies it is best to remain calm. Stay informed and focused
on the situation at hand. Exercise patience with those you encounter.
Be a good samaritan and helpful to others.

If you are a visitor and still in the area, listen for the name of
the city or town in which you are staying within local news updates.
Be sure you know the name of the County in which it
resides. Pay attention for instructions from local authorities.

Closely monitor NOAA Weather Radio or other local news outlets for
official storm information. Be ready to adapt to possible changes to
the forecast.

* Additional sources of information:
- for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov
- for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org
- for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org

Next update
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in Wilmington NC around 6 PM EDT, or sooner if conditions
warrant.


Kreitner


237 PM EDT Sat may 28 2016

This product covers southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina

**tropical depression two will approach the central South
Carolina coast this afternoon and evening and may briefly
strengthen to a weak tropical storm before landfall on Sunday
morning**

New information
---------------

* changes to watches and warnings:
    - none

* current watches and warnings:
    - a Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect for inland
      Horry... coastal Horry... inland Georgetown and coastal Georgetown

* storm information:
    - about 260 miles south-southwest of Wilmington NC or about 210
      miles south of Myrtle Beach SC
    - 30.7n 79.0w
    - storm intensity 35 mph
    - movement northwest or 310 degrees at 13 mph

Situation overview
------------------

Tropical Depression Two, located about 260 miles south-southwest of Myrtle
Beach, is forecast to strengthen into a weak tropical storm as it
approaches the South Carolina coast. Landfall is predicted near
Charleston on Sunday morning. The system is expected to turn to
the northeast later Sunday while weakening and then slowly move
along the South Carolina and North Carolina coastlines Monday through
Wednesday.

Rainfall over the next few days should average 1 to 3 inches. A few
locations may receive as much as 4 inches.

Sustained winds of 25 to 35 mph with gusts up to 50 mph are
expected to spread across Georgetown and southern Horry counties.
Elsewhere winds will range from 10 to 20 mph, with gusts to 30 mph
along the coast. No significant impacts from winds are expected
outside of the Tropical Storm Warning area.

Rough surf and an increased danger of strong rip currents can be
expected through Sunday along the entire coast from Georgetown
County northward to Pender County.

Potential impacts
-----------------

* flooding rain:
protect against locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible
limited impacts across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina. Potential impacts include:
    - localized flooding from rainfall may occur, especially in
      low-lying and poor drainage areas. Some rivers and creeks may
      rise as a result of the rain. Small streams, creeks, and
      ditches may overflow in some locations.
    - Several storm drains and retention ponds may become full and
      begin to overflow. Some brief Road closures are possible.

* Wind:
protect against hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across
southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina. Potential
impacts include:
    - damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored
      Mobile homes is possible. Unsecured lightweight objects may be
      blown about.
    - Some large limbs may break from trees. A few shallow rooted or
      weak trees may snap or be knocked down. Some fences and roadway
      signs damaged.
    - A few roads may become impassable due to debris, particularly
      within urban or heavily wooded locations. Hazardous driving
      conditions are possible, especially for high profile vehicles
      on bridges and other elevated roadways.
    - Scattered power and communications outages are possible.

* Surge:
protect against locally hazardous surge having possible limited
impacts across northeast South Carolina. Potential impacts in
this area include:
    - localized inundation and minor over-wash is possible, mainly
      along immediate shorelines and other vulnerable low-lying areas
      along the coast. Low spots along waterways and tidal creeks may
      also be impacted.
    - Some portions of near-shore roads and parking lots may become
      covered by surge water. Driving conditions may become hazardous
      in places where the surge covers the Road.
    - Minor to moderate beach erosion is possible, mainly in vulnerable
      locations along the ocean front.
    - Minor damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers is
      possible. A few small craft may break away from moorings if not
      properly secured.
    - Navigation may be difficult near inlets and waterways, as
      navigational aids may be off station or missing.

Elsewhere across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina, little to no impact is anticipated.

* Tornadoes:
protect against a tornado event having possible limited impacts
across coastal Georgetown and Horry counties. Potential impacts include:
    - the occurrence of isolated tornadoes can hinder the execution
      of emergency plans during tropical events.
    - A few places may experience tornado damage, along with power
      and communications disruptions.
    - Tornadoes can cause damage to trees, vehicles, boats, and
      buildings. Unsecured Mobile homes and poorly constructed
      structures are particularly vulnerable.

Elsewhere across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina, little to no impact is anticipated.

Precautionary/preparedness actions
----------------------------------

* other preparedness information:
now is the time to bring to completion all preparations to protect
life and property in accordance with your emergency plan.

Outside preparations should be wrapped up as soon as possible before
weather conditions deteriorate.

Always heed the advice of local officials and comply with any
orders that are issued. Remember, during the storm 9 1 1 emergency
services may not be able to immediately respond if conditions are
unsafe. This should be a big factor in your decision making.

Check-in with your emergency points of contact among family, friends,
and workmates. Inform them of your status and well-being. Let them
know how you intend to ride out the storm and when you plan to
check-in again.

In emergencies it is best to remain calm. Stay informed and focused
on the situation at hand. Exercise patience with those you encounter.
Be a good samaritan and helpful to others.

If you are a visitor and still in the area, listen for the name of
the city or town in which you are staying within local news updates.
Be sure you know the name of the County in which it
resides. Pay attention for instructions from local authorities.

Closely monitor NOAA Weather Radio or other local news outlets for
official storm information. Be ready to adapt to possible changes to
the forecast.

* Additional sources of information:
- for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov
- for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org
- for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org

Next update
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in Wilmington NC around 6 PM EDT, or sooner if conditions
warrant.


Kreitner

237 PM EDT Sat may 28 2016

This product covers southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina

**tropical depression two will approach the central South
Carolina coast this afternoon and evening and may briefly
strengthen to a weak tropical storm before landfall on Sunday
morning**

New information
---------------

* changes to watches and warnings:
    - none

* current watches and warnings:
    - a Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect for inland
      Horry... coastal Horry... inland Georgetown and coastal Georgetown

* storm information:
    - about 260 miles south-southwest of Wilmington NC or about 210
      miles south of Myrtle Beach SC
    - 30.7n 79.0w
    - storm intensity 35 mph
    - movement northwest or 310 degrees at 13 mph

Situation overview
------------------

Tropical Depression Two, located about 260 miles south-southwest of Myrtle
Beach, is forecast to strengthen into a weak tropical storm as it
approaches the South Carolina coast. Landfall is predicted near
Charleston on Sunday morning. The system is expected to turn to
the northeast later Sunday while weakening and then slowly move
along the South Carolina and North Carolina coastlines Monday through
Wednesday.

Rainfall over the next few days should average 1 to 3 inches. A few
locations may receive as much as 4 inches.

Sustained winds of 25 to 35 mph with gusts up to 50 mph are
expected to spread across Georgetown and southern Horry counties.
Elsewhere winds will range from 10 to 20 mph, with gusts to 30 mph
along the coast. No significant impacts from winds are expected
outside of the Tropical Storm Warning area.

Rough surf and an increased danger of strong rip currents can be
expected through Sunday along the entire coast from Georgetown
County northward to Pender County.

Potential impacts
-----------------

* flooding rain:
protect against locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible
limited impacts across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina. Potential impacts include:
    - localized flooding from rainfall may occur, especially in
      low-lying and poor drainage areas. Some rivers and creeks may
      rise as a result of the rain. Small streams, creeks, and
      ditches may overflow in some locations.
    - Several storm drains and retention ponds may become full and
      begin to overflow. Some brief Road closures are possible.

* Wind:
protect against hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across
southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina. Potential
impacts include:
    - damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored
      Mobile homes is possible. Unsecured lightweight objects may be
      blown about.
    - Some large limbs may break from trees. A few shallow rooted or
      weak trees may snap or be knocked down. Some fences and roadway
      signs damaged.
    - A few roads may become impassable due to debris, particularly
      within urban or heavily wooded locations. Hazardous driving
      conditions are possible, especially for high profile vehicles
      on bridges and other elevated roadways.
    - Scattered power and communications outages are possible.

* Surge:
protect against locally hazardous surge having possible limited
impacts across northeast South Carolina. Potential impacts in
this area include:
    - localized inundation and minor over-wash is possible, mainly
      along immediate shorelines and other vulnerable low-lying areas
      along the coast. Low spots along waterways and tidal creeks may
      also be impacted.
    - Some portions of near-shore roads and parking lots may become
      covered by surge water. Driving conditions may become hazardous
      in places where the surge covers the Road.
    - Minor to moderate beach erosion is possible, mainly in vulnerable
      locations along the ocean front.
    - Minor damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers is
      possible. A few small craft may break away from moorings if not
      properly secured.
    - Navigation may be difficult near inlets and waterways, as
      navigational aids may be off station or missing.

Elsewhere across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina, little to no impact is anticipated.

* Tornadoes:
protect against a tornado event having possible limited impacts
across coastal Georgetown and Horry counties. Potential impacts include:
    - the occurrence of isolated tornadoes can hinder the execution
      of emergency plans during tropical events.
    - A few places may experience tornado damage, along with power
      and communications disruptions.
    - Tornadoes can cause damage to trees, vehicles, boats, and
      buildings. Unsecured Mobile homes and poorly constructed
      structures are particularly vulnerable.

Elsewhere across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina, little to no impact is anticipated.

Precautionary/preparedness actions
----------------------------------

* other preparedness information:
now is the time to bring to completion all preparations to protect
life and property in accordance with your emergency plan.

Outside preparations should be wrapped up as soon as possible before
weather conditions deteriorate.

Always heed the advice of local officials and comply with any
orders that are issued. Remember, during the storm 9 1 1 emergency
services may not be able to immediately respond if conditions are
unsafe. This should be a big factor in your decision making.

Check-in with your emergency points of contact among family, friends,
and workmates. Inform them of your status and well-being. Let them
know how you intend to ride out the storm and when you plan to
check-in again.

In emergencies it is best to remain calm. Stay informed and focused
on the situation at hand. Exercise patience with those you encounter.
Be a good samaritan and helpful to others.

If you are a visitor and still in the area, listen for the name of
the city or town in which you are staying within local news updates.
Be sure you know the name of the County in which it
resides. Pay attention for instructions from local authorities.

Closely monitor NOAA Weather Radio or other local news outlets for
official storm information. Be ready to adapt to possible changes to
the forecast.

* Additional sources of information:
- for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov
- for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org
- for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org

Next update
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in Wilmington NC around 6 PM EDT, or sooner if conditions
warrant.


Kreitner

1123 am EDT Sat may 28 2016

This product covers southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina

**tropical depression two will approach the South Carolina coast
today and may briefly strengthen to a weak tropical storm**

New information
---------------

* changes to watches and warnings:
    - none

* current watches and warnings:
    - a Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect for inland
      Horry... coastal Horry... inland Georgetown and coastal Georgetown

* storm information:
    - about 280 miles south of Wilmington NC or about 240 miles south
      of Myrtle Beach SC
    - 30.3n 78.5w
    - storm intensity 35 mph
    - movement northwest or 310 degrees at 13 mph

Situation overview
------------------

Tropical Depression Two, located about 240 miles south of Myrtle
Beach, is forecast to strengthen into a weak tropical storm as it
approaches the South Carolina coast. Landfall is predicted near
Charleston on Sunday. The system is expected to turn to the
northeast later Sunday and slowly move near the upper South
Carolina and North Carolina coastline through Wednesday.

Rainfall over the next few days should average 1 to 3 inches. A few
locations may receive as much as 4 inches.

Sustained winds of 25 to 35 mph with gusts up to 50 mph are expected
to spread across Georgetown and southern Horry counties. Elsewhere
winds will range from 10 to 20 mph, with gusts to 30 mph along the
coast. No significant impacts from wind are expected outside of the
Tropical Storm Warning area.

Rough surf and an increased danger of strong rip currents can be
expected beginning late tonight and continuing through Sunday along
the entire coast from Georgetown County northward to Pender County.

Potential impacts
-----------------

* flooding rain:
protect against locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible
limited impacts across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina. Potential impacts include:
    - localized flooding from rainfall may occur, especially in
      low-lying and poor drainage areas. Some rivers and creeks may
      rise as a result of the rain. Small streams, creeks, and
      ditches may overflow in some locations.
    - Several storm drains and retention ponds may become full and
      begin to overflow. Some brief Road closures are possible.

* Wind:
protect against hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across
southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina. Potential
impacts include:
    - damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored
      Mobile homes is possible. Unsecured lightweight objects may be
      blown about.
    - Some large limbs may break from trees. A few shallow rooted or
      weak trees may snap or be knocked down. Some fences and roadway
      signs damaged.
    - A few roads may become impassable due to debris, particularly
      within urban or heavily wooded locations. Hazardous driving
      conditions are possible, especially for high profile vehicles
      on bridges and other elevated roadways.
    - Scattered power and communications outages are possible.

* Surge:
protect against locally hazardous surge having possible limited
impacts across northeast South Carolina. Potential impacts in
this area include:
    - localized inundation and minor over-wash is possible, mainly
      along immediate shorelines and other vulnerable low-lying areas
      along the coast. Low spots along waterways and tidal creeks may
      also be impacted.
    - Some portions of near-shore roads and parking lots may become
      covered by surge water. Driving conditions may become hazardous
      in places where the surge covers the Road.
    - Minor to moderate beach erosion is possible, mainly in vulnerable
      locations along the ocean front.
    - Minor damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers is
      possible. A few small craft may break away from moorings if not
      properly secured.
    - Navigation may be difficult near inlets and waterways, as
      navigational aids may be off station or missing.

Elsewhere across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina, little to no impact is anticipated.

Precautionary/preparedness actions
----------------------------------

* other preparedness information:
now is the time to bring to completion all preparations to protect
life and property in accordance with your emergency plan.

Outside preparations should be wrapped up as soon as possible before
weather conditions deteriorate.

Always heed the advice of local officials and comply with any
orders that are issued. Remember, during the storm 9 1 1 emergency
services may not be able to immediately respond if conditions are
unsafe. This should be a big factor in your decision making.

Check-in with your emergency points of contact among family, friends,
and workmates. Inform them of your status and well-being. Let them
know how you intend to ride out the storm and when you plan to
check-in again.

In emergencies it is best to remain calm. Stay informed and focused
on the situation at hand. Exercise patience with those you encounter.
Be a good samaritan and helpful to others.

If you are a visitor and still in the area, listen for the name of
the city or town in which you are staying within local news updates.
Be sure you know the name of the County in which it
resides. Pay attention for instructions from local authorities.

Closely monitor NOAA Weather Radio or other local news outlets for
official storm information. Be ready to adapt to possible changes to
the forecast.

* Additional sources of information:
- for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov
- for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org
- for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org

Next update
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in Wilmington NC around 3 PM EDT, or sooner if conditions
warrant.


Kreitner


1123 am EDT Sat may 28 2016

This product covers southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina

**tropical depression two will approach the South Carolina coast
today and may briefly strengthen to a weak tropical storm**

New information
---------------

* changes to watches and warnings:
    - none

* current watches and warnings:
    - a Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect for inland
      Horry... coastal Horry... inland Georgetown and coastal Georgetown

* storm information:
    - about 280 miles south of Wilmington NC or about 240 miles south
      of Myrtle Beach SC
    - 30.3n 78.5w
    - storm intensity 35 mph
    - movement northwest or 310 degrees at 13 mph

Situation overview
------------------

Tropical Depression Two, located about 240 miles south of Myrtle
Beach, is forecast to strengthen into a weak tropical storm as it
approaches the South Carolina coast. Landfall is predicted near
Charleston on Sunday. The system is expected to turn to the
northeast later Sunday and slowly move near the upper South
Carolina and North Carolina coastline through Wednesday.

Rainfall over the next few days should average 1 to 3 inches. A few
locations may receive as much as 4 inches.

Sustained winds of 25 to 35 mph with gusts up to 50 mph are expected
to spread across Georgetown and southern Horry counties. Elsewhere
winds will range from 10 to 20 mph, with gusts to 30 mph along the
coast. No significant impacts from wind are expected outside of the
Tropical Storm Warning area.

Rough surf and an increased danger of strong rip currents can be
expected beginning late tonight and continuing through Sunday along
the entire coast from Georgetown County northward to Pender County.

Potential impacts
-----------------

* flooding rain:
protect against locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible
limited impacts across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina. Potential impacts include:
    - localized flooding from rainfall may occur, especially in
      low-lying and poor drainage areas. Some rivers and creeks may
      rise as a result of the rain. Small streams, creeks, and
      ditches may overflow in some locations.
    - Several storm drains and retention ponds may become full and
      begin to overflow. Some brief Road closures are possible.

* Wind:
protect against hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across
southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina. Potential
impacts include:
    - damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored
      Mobile homes is possible. Unsecured lightweight objects may be
      blown about.
    - Some large limbs may break from trees. A few shallow rooted or
      weak trees may snap or be knocked down. Some fences and roadway
      signs damaged.
    - A few roads may become impassable due to debris, particularly
      within urban or heavily wooded locations. Hazardous driving
      conditions are possible, especially for high profile vehicles
      on bridges and other elevated roadways.
    - Scattered power and communications outages are possible.

* Surge:
protect against locally hazardous surge having possible limited
impacts across northeast South Carolina. Potential impacts in
this area include:
    - localized inundation and minor over-wash is possible, mainly
      along immediate shorelines and other vulnerable low-lying areas
      along the coast. Low spots along waterways and tidal creeks may
      also be impacted.
    - Some portions of near-shore roads and parking lots may become
      covered by surge water. Driving conditions may become hazardous
      in places where the surge covers the Road.
    - Minor to moderate beach erosion is possible, mainly in vulnerable
      locations along the ocean front.
    - Minor damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers is
      possible. A few small craft may break away from moorings if not
      properly secured.
    - Navigation may be difficult near inlets and waterways, as
      navigational aids may be off station or missing.

Elsewhere across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina, little to no impact is anticipated.

Precautionary/preparedness actions
----------------------------------

* other preparedness information:
now is the time to bring to completion all preparations to protect
life and property in accordance with your emergency plan.

Outside preparations should be wrapped up as soon as possible before
weather conditions deteriorate.

Always heed the advice of local officials and comply with any
orders that are issued. Remember, during the storm 9 1 1 emergency
services may not be able to immediately respond if conditions are
unsafe. This should be a big factor in your decision making.

Check-in with your emergency points of contact among family, friends,
and workmates. Inform them of your status and well-being. Let them
know how you intend to ride out the storm and when you plan to
check-in again.

In emergencies it is best to remain calm. Stay informed and focused
on the situation at hand. Exercise patience with those you encounter.
Be a good samaritan and helpful to others.

If you are a visitor and still in the area, listen for the name of
the city or town in which you are staying within local news updates.
Be sure you know the name of the County in which it
resides. Pay attention for instructions from local authorities.

Closely monitor NOAA Weather Radio or other local news outlets for
official storm information. Be ready to adapt to possible changes to
the forecast.

* Additional sources of information:
- for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov
- for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org
- for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org

Next update
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in Wilmington NC around 3 PM EDT, or sooner if conditions
warrant.


Kreitner


1123 am EDT Sat may 28 2016

This product covers southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina

**tropical depression two will approach the South Carolina coast
today and may briefly strengthen to a weak tropical storm**

New information
---------------

* changes to watches and warnings:
    - none

* current watches and warnings:
    - a Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect for inland
      Horry... coastal Horry... inland Georgetown and coastal Georgetown

* storm information:
    - about 280 miles south of Wilmington NC or about 240 miles south
      of Myrtle Beach SC
    - 30.3n 78.5w
    - storm intensity 35 mph
    - movement northwest or 310 degrees at 13 mph

Situation overview
------------------

Tropical Depression Two, located about 240 miles south of Myrtle
Beach, is forecast to strengthen into a weak tropical storm as it
approaches the South Carolina coast. Landfall is predicted near
Charleston on Sunday. The system is expected to turn to the
northeast later Sunday and slowly move near the upper South
Carolina and North Carolina coastline through Wednesday.

Rainfall over the next few days should average 1 to 3 inches. A few
locations may receive as much as 4 inches.

Sustained winds of 25 to 35 mph with gusts up to 50 mph are expected
to spread across Georgetown and southern Horry counties. Elsewhere
winds will range from 10 to 20 mph, with gusts to 30 mph along the
coast. No significant impacts from wind are expected outside of the
Tropical Storm Warning area.

Rough surf and an increased danger of strong rip currents can be
expected beginning late tonight and continuing through Sunday along
the entire coast from Georgetown County northward to Pender County.

Potential impacts
-----------------

* flooding rain:
protect against locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible
limited impacts across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina. Potential impacts include:
    - localized flooding from rainfall may occur, especially in
      low-lying and poor drainage areas. Some rivers and creeks may
      rise as a result of the rain. Small streams, creeks, and
      ditches may overflow in some locations.
    - Several storm drains and retention ponds may become full and
      begin to overflow. Some brief Road closures are possible.

* Wind:
protect against hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across
southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina. Potential
impacts include:
    - damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored
      Mobile homes is possible. Unsecured lightweight objects may be
      blown about.
    - Some large limbs may break from trees. A few shallow rooted or
      weak trees may snap or be knocked down. Some fences and roadway
      signs damaged.
    - A few roads may become impassable due to debris, particularly
      within urban or heavily wooded locations. Hazardous driving
      conditions are possible, especially for high profile vehicles
      on bridges and other elevated roadways.
    - Scattered power and communications outages are possible.

* Surge:
protect against locally hazardous surge having possible limited
impacts across northeast South Carolina. Potential impacts in
this area include:
    - localized inundation and minor over-wash is possible, mainly
      along immediate shorelines and other vulnerable low-lying areas
      along the coast. Low spots along waterways and tidal creeks may
      also be impacted.
    - Some portions of near-shore roads and parking lots may become
      covered by surge water. Driving conditions may become hazardous
      in places where the surge covers the Road.
    - Minor to moderate beach erosion is possible, mainly in vulnerable
      locations along the ocean front.
    - Minor damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers is
      possible. A few small craft may break away from moorings if not
      properly secured.
    - Navigation may be difficult near inlets and waterways, as
      navigational aids may be off station or missing.

Elsewhere across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina, little to no impact is anticipated.

Precautionary/preparedness actions
----------------------------------

* other preparedness information:
now is the time to bring to completion all preparations to protect
life and property in accordance with your emergency plan.

Outside preparations should be wrapped up as soon as possible before
weather conditions deteriorate.

Always heed the advice of local officials and comply with any
orders that are issued. Remember, during the storm 9 1 1 emergency
services may not be able to immediately respond if conditions are
unsafe. This should be a big factor in your decision making.

Check-in with your emergency points of contact among family, friends,
and workmates. Inform them of your status and well-being. Let them
know how you intend to ride out the storm and when you plan to
check-in again.

In emergencies it is best to remain calm. Stay informed and focused
on the situation at hand. Exercise patience with those you encounter.
Be a good samaritan and helpful to others.

If you are a visitor and still in the area, listen for the name of
the city or town in which you are staying within local news updates.
Be sure you know the name of the County in which it
resides. Pay attention for instructions from local authorities.

Closely monitor NOAA Weather Radio or other local news outlets for
official storm information. Be ready to adapt to possible changes to
the forecast.

* Additional sources of information:
- for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov
- for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org
- for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org

Next update
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in Wilmington NC around 3 PM EDT, or sooner if conditions
warrant.


Kreitner


1123 am EDT Sat may 28 2016

This product covers southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina

**tropical depression two will approach the South Carolina coast
today and may briefly strengthen to a weak tropical storm**

New information
---------------

* changes to watches and warnings:
    - none

* current watches and warnings:
    - a Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect for inland
      Horry... coastal Horry... inland Georgetown and coastal Georgetown

* storm information:
    - about 280 miles south of Wilmington NC or about 240 miles south
      of Myrtle Beach SC
    - 30.3n 78.5w
    - storm intensity 35 mph
    - movement northwest or 310 degrees at 13 mph

Situation overview
------------------

Tropical Depression Two, located about 240 miles south of Myrtle
Beach, is forecast to strengthen into a weak tropical storm as it
approaches the South Carolina coast. Landfall is predicted near
Charleston on Sunday. The system is expected to turn to the
northeast later Sunday and slowly move near the upper South
Carolina and North Carolina coastline through Wednesday.

Rainfall over the next few days should average 1 to 3 inches. A few
locations may receive as much as 4 inches.

Sustained winds of 25 to 35 mph with gusts up to 50 mph are expected
to spread across Georgetown and southern Horry counties. Elsewhere
winds will range from 10 to 20 mph, with gusts to 30 mph along the
coast. No significant impacts from wind are expected outside of the
Tropical Storm Warning area.

Rough surf and an increased danger of strong rip currents can be
expected beginning late tonight and continuing through Sunday along
the entire coast from Georgetown County northward to Pender County.

Potential impacts
-----------------

* flooding rain:
protect against locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible
limited impacts across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina. Potential impacts include:
    - localized flooding from rainfall may occur, especially in
      low-lying and poor drainage areas. Some rivers and creeks may
      rise as a result of the rain. Small streams, creeks, and
      ditches may overflow in some locations.
    - Several storm drains and retention ponds may become full and
      begin to overflow. Some brief Road closures are possible.

* Wind:
protect against hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across
southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina. Potential
impacts include:
    - damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored
      Mobile homes is possible. Unsecured lightweight objects may be
      blown about.
    - Some large limbs may break from trees. A few shallow rooted or
      weak trees may snap or be knocked down. Some fences and roadway
      signs damaged.
    - A few roads may become impassable due to debris, particularly
      within urban or heavily wooded locations. Hazardous driving
      conditions are possible, especially for high profile vehicles
      on bridges and other elevated roadways.
    - Scattered power and communications outages are possible.

* Surge:
protect against locally hazardous surge having possible limited
impacts across northeast South Carolina. Potential impacts in
this area include:
    - localized inundation and minor over-wash is possible, mainly
      along immediate shorelines and other vulnerable low-lying areas
      along the coast. Low spots along waterways and tidal creeks may
      also be impacted.
    - Some portions of near-shore roads and parking lots may become
      covered by surge water. Driving conditions may become hazardous
      in places where the surge covers the Road.
    - Minor to moderate beach erosion is possible, mainly in vulnerable
      locations along the ocean front.
    - Minor damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers is
      possible. A few small craft may break away from moorings if not
      properly secured.
    - Navigation may be difficult near inlets and waterways, as
      navigational aids may be off station or missing.

Elsewhere across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina, little to no impact is anticipated.

Precautionary/preparedness actions
----------------------------------

* other preparedness information:
now is the time to bring to completion all preparations to protect
life and property in accordance with your emergency plan.

Outside preparations should be wrapped up as soon as possible before
weather conditions deteriorate.

Always heed the advice of local officials and comply with any
orders that are issued. Remember, during the storm 9 1 1 emergency
services may not be able to immediately respond if conditions are
unsafe. This should be a big factor in your decision making.

Check-in with your emergency points of contact among family, friends,
and workmates. Inform them of your status and well-being. Let them
know how you intend to ride out the storm and when you plan to
check-in again.

In emergencies it is best to remain calm. Stay informed and focused
on the situation at hand. Exercise patience with those you encounter.
Be a good samaritan and helpful to others.

If you are a visitor and still in the area, listen for the name of
the city or town in which you are staying within local news updates.
Be sure you know the name of the County in which it
resides. Pay attention for instructions from local authorities.

Closely monitor NOAA Weather Radio or other local news outlets for
official storm information. Be ready to adapt to possible changes to
the forecast.

* Additional sources of information:
- for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov
- for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org
- for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org

Next update
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in Wilmington NC around 3 PM EDT, or sooner if conditions
warrant.


Kreitner


1123 am EDT Sat may 28 2016

This product covers southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina

**tropical depression two will approach the South Carolina coast
today and may briefly strengthen to a weak tropical storm**

New information
---------------

* changes to watches and warnings:
    - none

* current watches and warnings:
    - a Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect for inland
      Horry... coastal Horry... inland Georgetown and coastal Georgetown

* storm information:
    - about 280 miles south of Wilmington NC or about 240 miles south
      of Myrtle Beach SC
    - 30.3n 78.5w
    - storm intensity 35 mph
    - movement northwest or 310 degrees at 13 mph

Situation overview
------------------

Tropical Depression Two, located about 240 miles south of Myrtle
Beach, is forecast to strengthen into a weak tropical storm as it
approaches the South Carolina coast. Landfall is predicted near
Charleston on Sunday. The system is expected to turn to the
northeast later Sunday and slowly move near the upper South
Carolina and North Carolina coastline through Wednesday.

Rainfall over the next few days should average 1 to 3 inches. A few
locations may receive as much as 4 inches.

Sustained winds of 25 to 35 mph with gusts up to 50 mph are expected
to spread across Georgetown and southern Horry counties. Elsewhere
winds will range from 10 to 20 mph, with gusts to 30 mph along the
coast. No significant impacts from wind are expected outside of the
Tropical Storm Warning area.

Rough surf and an increased danger of strong rip currents can be
expected beginning late tonight and continuing through Sunday along
the entire coast from Georgetown County northward to Pender County.

Potential impacts
-----------------

* flooding rain:
protect against locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible
limited impacts across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina. Potential impacts include:
    - localized flooding from rainfall may occur, especially in
      low-lying and poor drainage areas. Some rivers and creeks may
      rise as a result of the rain. Small streams, creeks, and
      ditches may overflow in some locations.
    - Several storm drains and retention ponds may become full and
      begin to overflow. Some brief Road closures are possible.

* Wind:
protect against hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across
southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina. Potential
impacts include:
    - damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored
      Mobile homes is possible. Unsecured lightweight objects may be
      blown about.
    - Some large limbs may break from trees. A few shallow rooted or
      weak trees may snap or be knocked down. Some fences and roadway
      signs damaged.
    - A few roads may become impassable due to debris, particularly
      within urban or heavily wooded locations. Hazardous driving
      conditions are possible, especially for high profile vehicles
      on bridges and other elevated roadways.
    - Scattered power and communications outages are possible.

* Surge:
protect against locally hazardous surge having possible limited
impacts across northeast South Carolina. Potential impacts in
this area include:
    - localized inundation and minor over-wash is possible, mainly
      along immediate shorelines and other vulnerable low-lying areas
      along the coast. Low spots along waterways and tidal creeks may
      also be impacted.
    - Some portions of near-shore roads and parking lots may become
      covered by surge water. Driving conditions may become hazardous
      in places where the surge covers the Road.
    - Minor to moderate beach erosion is possible, mainly in vulnerable
      locations along the ocean front.
    - Minor damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers is
      possible. A few small craft may break away from moorings if not
      properly secured.
    - Navigation may be difficult near inlets and waterways, as
      navigational aids may be off station or missing.

Elsewhere across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina, little to no impact is anticipated.

Precautionary/preparedness actions
----------------------------------

* other preparedness information:
now is the time to bring to completion all preparations to protect
life and property in accordance with your emergency plan.

Outside preparations should be wrapped up as soon as possible before
weather conditions deteriorate.

Always heed the advice of local officials and comply with any
orders that are issued. Remember, during the storm 9 1 1 emergency
services may not be able to immediately respond if conditions are
unsafe. This should be a big factor in your decision making.

Check-in with your emergency points of contact among family, friends,
and workmates. Inform them of your status and well-being. Let them
know how you intend to ride out the storm and when you plan to
check-in again.

In emergencies it is best to remain calm. Stay informed and focused
on the situation at hand. Exercise patience with those you encounter.
Be a good samaritan and helpful to others.

If you are a visitor and still in the area, listen for the name of
the city or town in which you are staying within local news updates.
Be sure you know the name of the County in which it
resides. Pay attention for instructions from local authorities.

Closely monitor NOAA Weather Radio or other local news outlets for
official storm information. Be ready to adapt to possible changes to
the forecast.

* Additional sources of information:
- for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov
- for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org
- for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org

Next update
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in Wilmington NC around 3 PM EDT, or sooner if conditions
warrant.


Kreitner


1123 am EDT Sat may 28 2016

This product covers southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina

**tropical depression two will approach the South Carolina coast
today and may briefly strengthen to a weak tropical storm**

New information
---------------

* changes to watches and warnings:
    - none

* current watches and warnings:
    - a Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect for inland
      Horry... coastal Horry... inland Georgetown and coastal Georgetown

* storm information:
    - about 280 miles south of Wilmington NC or about 240 miles south
      of Myrtle Beach SC
    - 30.3n 78.5w
    - storm intensity 35 mph
    - movement northwest or 310 degrees at 13 mph

Situation overview
------------------

Tropical Depression Two, located about 240 miles south of Myrtle
Beach, is forecast to strengthen into a weak tropical storm as it
approaches the South Carolina coast. Landfall is predicted near
Charleston on Sunday. The system is expected to turn to the
northeast later Sunday and slowly move near the upper South
Carolina and North Carolina coastline through Wednesday.

Rainfall over the next few days should average 1 to 3 inches. A few
locations may receive as much as 4 inches.

Sustained winds of 25 to 35 mph with gusts up to 50 mph are expected
to spread across Georgetown and southern Horry counties. Elsewhere
winds will range from 10 to 20 mph, with gusts to 30 mph along the
coast. No significant impacts from wind are expected outside of the
Tropical Storm Warning area.

Rough surf and an increased danger of strong rip currents can be
expected beginning late tonight and continuing through Sunday along
the entire coast from Georgetown County northward to Pender County.

Potential impacts
-----------------

* flooding rain:
protect against locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible
limited impacts across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina. Potential impacts include:
    - localized flooding from rainfall may occur, especially in
      low-lying and poor drainage areas. Some rivers and creeks may
      rise as a result of the rain. Small streams, creeks, and
      ditches may overflow in some locations.
    - Several storm drains and retention ponds may become full and
      begin to overflow. Some brief Road closures are possible.

* Wind:
protect against hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across
southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina. Potential
impacts include:
    - damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored
      Mobile homes is possible. Unsecured lightweight objects may be
      blown about.
    - Some large limbs may break from trees. A few shallow rooted or
      weak trees may snap or be knocked down. Some fences and roadway
      signs damaged.
    - A few roads may become impassable due to debris, particularly
      within urban or heavily wooded locations. Hazardous driving
      conditions are possible, especially for high profile vehicles
      on bridges and other elevated roadways.
    - Scattered power and communications outages are possible.

* Surge:
protect against locally hazardous surge having possible limited
impacts across northeast South Carolina. Potential impacts in
this area include:
    - localized inundation and minor over-wash is possible, mainly
      along immediate shorelines and other vulnerable low-lying areas
      along the coast. Low spots along waterways and tidal creeks may
      also be impacted.
    - Some portions of near-shore roads and parking lots may become
      covered by surge water. Driving conditions may become hazardous
      in places where the surge covers the Road.
    - Minor to moderate beach erosion is possible, mainly in vulnerable
      locations along the ocean front.
    - Minor damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers is
      possible. A few small craft may break away from moorings if not
      properly secured.
    - Navigation may be difficult near inlets and waterways, as
      navigational aids may be off station or missing.

Elsewhere across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina, little to no impact is anticipated.

Precautionary/preparedness actions
----------------------------------

* other preparedness information:
now is the time to bring to completion all preparations to protect
life and property in accordance with your emergency plan.

Outside preparations should be wrapped up as soon as possible before
weather conditions deteriorate.

Always heed the advice of local officials and comply with any
orders that are issued. Remember, during the storm 9 1 1 emergency
services may not be able to immediately respond if conditions are
unsafe. This should be a big factor in your decision making.

Check-in with your emergency points of contact among family, friends,
and workmates. Inform them of your status and well-being. Let them
know how you intend to ride out the storm and when you plan to
check-in again.

In emergencies it is best to remain calm. Stay informed and focused
on the situation at hand. Exercise patience with those you encounter.
Be a good samaritan and helpful to others.

If you are a visitor and still in the area, listen for the name of
the city or town in which you are staying within local news updates.
Be sure you know the name of the County in which it
resides. Pay attention for instructions from local authorities.

Closely monitor NOAA Weather Radio or other local news outlets for
official storm information. Be ready to adapt to possible changes to
the forecast.

* Additional sources of information:
- for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov
- for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org
- for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org

Next update
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in Wilmington NC around 3 PM EDT, or sooner if conditions
warrant.


Kreitner

1123 am EDT Sat may 28 2016

This product covers southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina

**tropical depression two will approach the South Carolina coast
today and may briefly strengthen to a weak tropical storm**

New information
---------------

* changes to watches and warnings:
    - none

* current watches and warnings:
    - a Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect for inland
      Horry... coastal Horry... inland Georgetown and coastal Georgetown

* storm information:
    - about 280 miles south of Wilmington NC or about 240 miles south
      of Myrtle Beach SC
    - 30.3n 78.5w
    - storm intensity 35 mph
    - movement northwest or 310 degrees at 13 mph

Situation overview
------------------

Tropical Depression Two, located about 240 miles south of Myrtle
Beach, is forecast to strengthen into a weak tropical storm as it
approaches the South Carolina coast. Landfall is predicted near
Charleston on Sunday. The system is expected to turn to the
northeast later Sunday and slowly move near the upper South
Carolina and North Carolina coastline through Wednesday.

Rainfall over the next few days should average 1 to 3 inches. A few
locations may receive as much as 4 inches.

Sustained winds of 25 to 35 mph with gusts up to 50 mph are expected
to spread across Georgetown and southern Horry counties. Elsewhere
winds will range from 10 to 20 mph, with gusts to 30 mph along the
coast. No significant impacts from wind are expected outside of the
Tropical Storm Warning area.

Rough surf and an increased danger of strong rip currents can be
expected beginning late tonight and continuing through Sunday along
the entire coast from Georgetown County northward to Pender County.

Potential impacts
-----------------

* flooding rain:
protect against locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible
limited impacts across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina. Potential impacts include:
    - localized flooding from rainfall may occur, especially in
      low-lying and poor drainage areas. Some rivers and creeks may
      rise as a result of the rain. Small streams, creeks, and
      ditches may overflow in some locations.
    - Several storm drains and retention ponds may become full and
      begin to overflow. Some brief Road closures are possible.

* Wind:
protect against hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across
southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina. Potential
impacts include:
    - damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored
      Mobile homes is possible. Unsecured lightweight objects may be
      blown about.
    - Some large limbs may break from trees. A few shallow rooted or
      weak trees may snap or be knocked down. Some fences and roadway
      signs damaged.
    - A few roads may become impassable due to debris, particularly
      within urban or heavily wooded locations. Hazardous driving
      conditions are possible, especially for high profile vehicles
      on bridges and other elevated roadways.
    - Scattered power and communications outages are possible.

* Surge:
protect against locally hazardous surge having possible limited
impacts across northeast South Carolina. Potential impacts in
this area include:
    - localized inundation and minor over-wash is possible, mainly
      along immediate shorelines and other vulnerable low-lying areas
      along the coast. Low spots along waterways and tidal creeks may
      also be impacted.
    - Some portions of near-shore roads and parking lots may become
      covered by surge water. Driving conditions may become hazardous
      in places where the surge covers the Road.
    - Minor to moderate beach erosion is possible, mainly in vulnerable
      locations along the ocean front.
    - Minor damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers is
      possible. A few small craft may break away from moorings if not
      properly secured.
    - Navigation may be difficult near inlets and waterways, as
      navigational aids may be off station or missing.

Elsewhere across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina, little to no impact is anticipated.

Precautionary/preparedness actions
----------------------------------

* other preparedness information:
now is the time to bring to completion all preparations to protect
life and property in accordance with your emergency plan.

Outside preparations should be wrapped up as soon as possible before
weather conditions deteriorate.

Always heed the advice of local officials and comply with any
orders that are issued. Remember, during the storm 9 1 1 emergency
services may not be able to immediately respond if conditions are
unsafe. This should be a big factor in your decision making.

Check-in with your emergency points of contact among family, friends,
and workmates. Inform them of your status and well-being. Let them
know how you intend to ride out the storm and when you plan to
check-in again.

In emergencies it is best to remain calm. Stay informed and focused
on the situation at hand. Exercise patience with those you encounter.
Be a good samaritan and helpful to others.

If you are a visitor and still in the area, listen for the name of
the city or town in which you are staying within local news updates.
Be sure you know the name of the County in which it
resides. Pay attention for instructions from local authorities.

Closely monitor NOAA Weather Radio or other local news outlets for
official storm information. Be ready to adapt to possible changes to
the forecast.

* Additional sources of information:
- for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov
- for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org
- for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org

Next update
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in Wilmington NC around 3 PM EDT, or sooner if conditions
warrant.


Kreitner


1123 am EDT Sat may 28 2016

This product covers southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina

**tropical depression two will approach the South Carolina coast
today and may briefly strengthen to a weak tropical storm**

New information
---------------

* changes to watches and warnings:
    - none

* current watches and warnings:
    - a Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect for inland
      Horry... coastal Horry... inland Georgetown and coastal Georgetown

* storm information:
    - about 280 miles south of Wilmington NC or about 240 miles south
      of Myrtle Beach SC
    - 30.3n 78.5w
    - storm intensity 35 mph
    - movement northwest or 310 degrees at 13 mph

Situation overview
------------------

Tropical Depression Two, located about 240 miles south of Myrtle
Beach, is forecast to strengthen into a weak tropical storm as it
approaches the South Carolina coast. Landfall is predicted near
Charleston on Sunday. The system is expected to turn to the
northeast later Sunday and slowly move near the upper South
Carolina and North Carolina coastline through Wednesday.

Rainfall over the next few days should average 1 to 3 inches. A few
locations may receive as much as 4 inches.

Sustained winds of 25 to 35 mph with gusts up to 50 mph are expected
to spread across Georgetown and southern Horry counties. Elsewhere
winds will range from 10 to 20 mph, with gusts to 30 mph along the
coast. No significant impacts from wind are expected outside of the
Tropical Storm Warning area.

Rough surf and an increased danger of strong rip currents can be
expected beginning late tonight and continuing through Sunday along
the entire coast from Georgetown County northward to Pender County.

Potential impacts
-----------------

* flooding rain:
protect against locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible
limited impacts across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina. Potential impacts include:
    - localized flooding from rainfall may occur, especially in
      low-lying and poor drainage areas. Some rivers and creeks may
      rise as a result of the rain. Small streams, creeks, and
      ditches may overflow in some locations.
    - Several storm drains and retention ponds may become full and
      begin to overflow. Some brief Road closures are possible.

* Wind:
protect against hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across
southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina. Potential
impacts include:
    - damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored
      Mobile homes is possible. Unsecured lightweight objects may be
      blown about.
    - Some large limbs may break from trees. A few shallow rooted or
      weak trees may snap or be knocked down. Some fences and roadway
      signs damaged.
    - A few roads may become impassable due to debris, particularly
      within urban or heavily wooded locations. Hazardous driving
      conditions are possible, especially for high profile vehicles
      on bridges and other elevated roadways.
    - Scattered power and communications outages are possible.

* Surge:
protect against locally hazardous surge having possible limited
impacts across northeast South Carolina. Potential impacts in
this area include:
    - localized inundation and minor over-wash is possible, mainly
      along immediate shorelines and other vulnerable low-lying areas
      along the coast. Low spots along waterways and tidal creeks may
      also be impacted.
    - Some portions of near-shore roads and parking lots may become
      covered by surge water. Driving conditions may become hazardous
      in places where the surge covers the Road.
    - Minor to moderate beach erosion is possible, mainly in vulnerable
      locations along the ocean front.
    - Minor damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers is
      possible. A few small craft may break away from moorings if not
      properly secured.
    - Navigation may be difficult near inlets and waterways, as
      navigational aids may be off station or missing.

Elsewhere across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina, little to no impact is anticipated.

Precautionary/preparedness actions
----------------------------------

* other preparedness information:
now is the time to bring to completion all preparations to protect
life and property in accordance with your emergency plan.

Outside preparations should be wrapped up as soon as possible before
weather conditions deteriorate.

Always heed the advice of local officials and comply with any
orders that are issued. Remember, during the storm 9 1 1 emergency
services may not be able to immediately respond if conditions are
unsafe. This should be a big factor in your decision making.

Check-in with your emergency points of contact among family, friends,
and workmates. Inform them of your status and well-being. Let them
know how you intend to ride out the storm and when you plan to
check-in again.

In emergencies it is best to remain calm. Stay informed and focused
on the situation at hand. Exercise patience with those you encounter.
Be a good samaritan and helpful to others.

If you are a visitor and still in the area, listen for the name of
the city or town in which you are staying within local news updates.
Be sure you know the name of the County in which it
resides. Pay attention for instructions from local authorities.

Closely monitor NOAA Weather Radio or other local news outlets for
official storm information. Be ready to adapt to possible changes to
the forecast.

* Additional sources of information:
- for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov
- for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org
- for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org

Next update
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in Wilmington NC around 3 PM EDT, or sooner if conditions
warrant.


Kreitner

855 am EDT Sat may 28 2016

This product covers southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina

**tropical depression two will approach the South Carolina coast today
and may briefly strengthen to a weak tropical storm**

New information
---------------

* changes to watches and warnings:
    - none

* current watches and warnings:
    - a Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect for inland
      Horry... coastal Horry... inland Georgetown and coastal Georgetown

* storm information:
    - about 290 miles south of Wilmington NC or about 260 miles
      south-southeast of Myrtle Beach SC
    - 30.0n 78.0w
    - storm intensity 35 mph
    - movement northwest or 305 degrees at 14 mph

Situation overview
------------------

Tropical Depression Two... located about 260 miles south-southeast of Myrtle
Beach... is forecast to briefly strengthen into a weak tropical storm
early Sunday as it approaches the South Carolina coast near
Charleston. The tropical system is expected to turn to the northeast
on Sunday and slowly move up the Carolina coastline through Wednesday.

Rainfall is expected to produce the most significant impacts from this
system, as an average of 1 to 3 inches is forecast to fall between
Saturday afternoon and Sunday night across northeast South Carolina
and southeast North Carolina. A few locations may receive as much as
4 inches of rain.

Sustained winds of 30 mph with gusts of 40 to 50 mph are expected to
spread across Georgetown County on Sunday, and potentially into
southern Horry County as well. Elsewhere across northeastern
South Carolina, winds will range from 10 to 20 mph, with gusts to
30 mph along the coast. Significant impacts from wind are less
likely across southeast North Carolina.

Rough surf and an increased danger of strong rip currents can be
expected beginning late Saturday afternoon and continuing through
Sunday along the entire coast from Georgetown County northward to
Pender County.

Potential impacts
-----------------

* flooding rain:
protect against locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible
limited impacts across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina. Potential impacts include:
    - localized flooding from rainfall may occur, especially in
      low-lying and poor drainage areas. Some rivers and creeks may
      rise as a result of the rain. Small streams, creeks, and
      ditches may overflow in some locations.
    - Several storm drains and retention ponds may become full and
      begin to overflow. Some brief Road closures are possible.

* Wind:
protect against hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across
southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina. Potential
impacts include:
    - damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored
      Mobile homes is possible. Unsecured lightweight objects may be
      blown about.
    - Some large limbs may break from trees. A few shallow rooted or
      weak trees may snap or be knocked down. Some fences and roadway
      signs damaged.
    - A few roads may become impassable due to debris, particularly
      within urban or heavily wooded locations. Hazardous driving
      conditions are possible, especially for high profile vehicles
      on bridges and other elevated roadways.
    - Scattered power and communications outages are possible.

* Other coastal hazards:
    -rough surf will develop along the northeast South Carolina coast
     by late Saturday afternoon and will spread to the coast of
     southeast North Carolina by Sunday. There will be an increasing
     danger of strong rip currents beginning Saturday afternoon and
     continuing through Sunday for all area beaches.

* Surge:
protect against locally hazardous surge having possible limited
impacts across northeast South Carolina. Potential impacts in
this area include:
    - localized inundation and minor over-wash is possible, mainly
      along immediate shorelines and other vulnerable low-lying areas
      along the coast. Low spots along waterways and tidal creeks may
      also be impacted.
    - Some portions of near-shore roads and parking lots may become
      covered by surge water. Driving conditions may become hazardous
      in places where the surge covers the Road.
    - Minor to moderate beach erosion is possible, mainly in vulnerable
      locations along the ocean front.
    - Minor damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers is
      possible. A few small craft may break away from moorings if not
      properly secured.
    - Navigation may be difficult near inlets and waterways, as
      navigational aids may be off station or missing.

Elsewhere across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina, little to no impact is anticipated.

Precautionary/preparedness actions
----------------------------------

* other preparedness information:
now is the time to bring to completion all preparations to protect
life and property in accordance with your emergency plan.

Outside preparations should be wrapped up as soon as possible before
weather conditions deteriorate.

Always heed the advice of local officials and comply with any
orders that are issued. Remember, during the storm 9 1 1 emergency
services may not be able to immediately respond if conditions are
unsafe. This should be a big factor in your decision making.

Check-in with your emergency points of contact among family, friends,
and workmates. Inform them of your status and well-being. Let them
know how you intend to ride out the storm and when you plan to
check-in again.

In emergencies it is best to remain calm. Stay informed and focused
on the situation at hand. Exercise patience with those you encounter.
Be a good samaritan and helpful to others.

If you are a visitor and still in the area, listen for the name of
the city or town in which you are staying within local news updates.
Be sure you know the name of the County or Parish in which it
resides. Pay attention for instructions from local authorities.

Closely monitor NOAA Weather Radio or other local news outlets for
official storm information. Be ready to adapt to possible changes to
the forecast.

* Additional sources of information:
- for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov
- for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org
- for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org

Next update
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in Wilmington NC around 12 PM EDT, or sooner if conditions
warrant.


Kreitner


855 am EDT Sat may 28 2016

This product covers southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina

**tropical depression two will approach the South Carolina coast today
and may briefly strengthen to a weak tropical storm**

New information
---------------

* changes to watches and warnings:
    - none

* current watches and warnings:
    - a Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect for inland
      Horry... coastal Horry... inland Georgetown and coastal Georgetown

* storm information:
    - about 290 miles south of Wilmington NC or about 260 miles
      south-southeast of Myrtle Beach SC
    - 30.0n 78.0w
    - storm intensity 35 mph
    - movement northwest or 305 degrees at 14 mph

Situation overview
------------------

Tropical Depression Two... located about 260 miles south-southeast of Myrtle
Beach... is forecast to briefly strengthen into a weak tropical storm
early Sunday as it approaches the South Carolina coast near
Charleston. The tropical system is expected to turn to the northeast
on Sunday and slowly move up the Carolina coastline through Wednesday.

Rainfall is expected to produce the most significant impacts from this
system, as an average of 1 to 3 inches is forecast to fall between
Saturday afternoon and Sunday night across northeast South Carolina
and southeast North Carolina. A few locations may receive as much as
4 inches of rain.

Sustained winds of 30 mph with gusts of 40 to 50 mph are expected to
spread across Georgetown County on Sunday, and potentially into
southern Horry County as well. Elsewhere across northeastern
South Carolina, winds will range from 10 to 20 mph, with gusts to
30 mph along the coast. Significant impacts from wind are less
likely across southeast North Carolina.

Rough surf and an increased danger of strong rip currents can be
expected beginning late Saturday afternoon and continuing through
Sunday along the entire coast from Georgetown County northward to
Pender County.

Potential impacts
-----------------

* flooding rain:
protect against locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible
limited impacts across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina. Potential impacts include:
    - localized flooding from rainfall may occur, especially in
      low-lying and poor drainage areas. Some rivers and creeks may
      rise as a result of the rain. Small streams, creeks, and
      ditches may overflow in some locations.
    - Several storm drains and retention ponds may become full and
      begin to overflow. Some brief Road closures are possible.

* Wind:
protect against hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across
southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina. Potential
impacts include:
    - damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored
      Mobile homes is possible. Unsecured lightweight objects may be
      blown about.
    - Some large limbs may break from trees. A few shallow rooted or
      weak trees may snap or be knocked down. Some fences and roadway
      signs damaged.
    - A few roads may become impassable due to debris, particularly
      within urban or heavily wooded locations. Hazardous driving
      conditions are possible, especially for high profile vehicles
      on bridges and other elevated roadways.
    - Scattered power and communications outages are possible.

* Other coastal hazards:
    -rough surf will develop along the northeast South Carolina coast
     by late Saturday afternoon and will spread to the coast of
     southeast North Carolina by Sunday. There will be an increasing
     danger of strong rip currents beginning Saturday afternoon and
     continuing through Sunday for all area beaches.

* Surge:
protect against locally hazardous surge having possible limited
impacts across northeast South Carolina. Potential impacts in
this area include:
    - localized inundation and minor over-wash is possible, mainly
      along immediate shorelines and other vulnerable low-lying areas
      along the coast. Low spots along waterways and tidal creeks may
      also be impacted.
    - Some portions of near-shore roads and parking lots may become
      covered by surge water. Driving conditions may become hazardous
      in places where the surge covers the Road.
    - Minor to moderate beach erosion is possible, mainly in vulnerable
      locations along the ocean front.
    - Minor damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers is
      possible. A few small craft may break away from moorings if not
      properly secured.
    - Navigation may be difficult near inlets and waterways, as
      navigational aids may be off station or missing.

Elsewhere across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina, little to no impact is anticipated.

Precautionary/preparedness actions
----------------------------------

* other preparedness information:
now is the time to bring to completion all preparations to protect
life and property in accordance with your emergency plan.

Outside preparations should be wrapped up as soon as possible before
weather conditions deteriorate.

Always heed the advice of local officials and comply with any
orders that are issued. Remember, during the storm 9 1 1 emergency
services may not be able to immediately respond if conditions are
unsafe. This should be a big factor in your decision making.

Check-in with your emergency points of contact among family, friends,
and workmates. Inform them of your status and well-being. Let them
know how you intend to ride out the storm and when you plan to
check-in again.

In emergencies it is best to remain calm. Stay informed and focused
on the situation at hand. Exercise patience with those you encounter.
Be a good samaritan and helpful to others.

If you are a visitor and still in the area, listen for the name of
the city or town in which you are staying within local news updates.
Be sure you know the name of the County or Parish in which it
resides. Pay attention for instructions from local authorities.

Closely monitor NOAA Weather Radio or other local news outlets for
official storm information. Be ready to adapt to possible changes to
the forecast.

* Additional sources of information:
- for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov
- for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org
- for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org

Next update
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in Wilmington NC around 12 PM EDT, or sooner if conditions
warrant.


Kreitner


855 am EDT Sat may 28 2016

This product covers southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina

**tropical depression two will approach the South Carolina coast today
and may briefly strengthen to a weak tropical storm**

New information
---------------

* changes to watches and warnings:
    - none

* current watches and warnings:
    - a Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect for inland
      Horry... coastal Horry... inland Georgetown and coastal Georgetown

* storm information:
    - about 290 miles south of Wilmington NC or about 260 miles
      south-southeast of Myrtle Beach SC
    - 30.0n 78.0w
    - storm intensity 35 mph
    - movement northwest or 305 degrees at 14 mph

Situation overview
------------------

Tropical Depression Two... located about 260 miles south-southeast of Myrtle
Beach... is forecast to briefly strengthen into a weak tropical storm
early Sunday as it approaches the South Carolina coast near
Charleston. The tropical system is expected to turn to the northeast
on Sunday and slowly move up the Carolina coastline through Wednesday.

Rainfall is expected to produce the most significant impacts from this
system, as an average of 1 to 3 inches is forecast to fall between
Saturday afternoon and Sunday night across northeast South Carolina
and southeast North Carolina. A few locations may receive as much as
4 inches of rain.

Sustained winds of 30 mph with gusts of 40 to 50 mph are expected to
spread across Georgetown County on Sunday, and potentially into
southern Horry County as well. Elsewhere across northeastern
South Carolina, winds will range from 10 to 20 mph, with gusts to
30 mph along the coast. Significant impacts from wind are less
likely across southeast North Carolina.

Rough surf and an increased danger of strong rip currents can be
expected beginning late Saturday afternoon and continuing through
Sunday along the entire coast from Georgetown County northward to
Pender County.

Potential impacts
-----------------

* flooding rain:
protect against locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible
limited impacts across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina. Potential impacts include:
    - localized flooding from rainfall may occur, especially in
      low-lying and poor drainage areas. Some rivers and creeks may
      rise as a result of the rain. Small streams, creeks, and
      ditches may overflow in some locations.
    - Several storm drains and retention ponds may become full and
      begin to overflow. Some brief Road closures are possible.

* Wind:
protect against hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across
southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina. Potential
impacts include:
    - damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored
      Mobile homes is possible. Unsecured lightweight objects may be
      blown about.
    - Some large limbs may break from trees. A few shallow rooted or
      weak trees may snap or be knocked down. Some fences and roadway
      signs damaged.
    - A few roads may become impassable due to debris, particularly
      within urban or heavily wooded locations. Hazardous driving
      conditions are possible, especially for high profile vehicles
      on bridges and other elevated roadways.
    - Scattered power and communications outages are possible.

* Other coastal hazards:
    -rough surf will develop along the northeast South Carolina coast
     by late Saturday afternoon and will spread to the coast of
     southeast North Carolina by Sunday. There will be an increasing
     danger of strong rip currents beginning Saturday afternoon and
     continuing through Sunday for all area beaches.

* Surge:
protect against locally hazardous surge having possible limited
impacts across northeast South Carolina. Potential impacts in
this area include:
    - localized inundation and minor over-wash is possible, mainly
      along immediate shorelines and other vulnerable low-lying areas
      along the coast. Low spots along waterways and tidal creeks may
      also be impacted.
    - Some portions of near-shore roads and parking lots may become
      covered by surge water. Driving conditions may become hazardous
      in places where the surge covers the Road.
    - Minor to moderate beach erosion is possible, mainly in vulnerable
      locations along the ocean front.
    - Minor damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers is
      possible. A few small craft may break away from moorings if not
      properly secured.
    - Navigation may be difficult near inlets and waterways, as
      navigational aids may be off station or missing.

Elsewhere across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina, little to no impact is anticipated.

Precautionary/preparedness actions
----------------------------------

* other preparedness information:
now is the time to bring to completion all preparations to protect
life and property in accordance with your emergency plan.

Outside preparations should be wrapped up as soon as possible before
weather conditions deteriorate.

Always heed the advice of local officials and comply with any
orders that are issued. Remember, during the storm 9 1 1 emergency
services may not be able to immediately respond if conditions are
unsafe. This should be a big factor in your decision making.

Check-in with your emergency points of contact among family, friends,
and workmates. Inform them of your status and well-being. Let them
know how you intend to ride out the storm and when you plan to
check-in again.

In emergencies it is best to remain calm. Stay informed and focused
on the situation at hand. Exercise patience with those you encounter.
Be a good samaritan and helpful to others.

If you are a visitor and still in the area, listen for the name of
the city or town in which you are staying within local news updates.
Be sure you know the name of the County or Parish in which it
resides. Pay attention for instructions from local authorities.

Closely monitor NOAA Weather Radio or other local news outlets for
official storm information. Be ready to adapt to possible changes to
the forecast.

* Additional sources of information:
- for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov
- for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org
- for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org

Next update
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in Wilmington NC around 12 PM EDT, or sooner if conditions
warrant.


Kreitner


855 am EDT Sat may 28 2016

This product covers southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina

**tropical depression two will approach the South Carolina coast today
and may briefly strengthen to a weak tropical storm**

New information
---------------

* changes to watches and warnings:
    - none

* current watches and warnings:
    - a Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect for inland
      Horry... coastal Horry... inland Georgetown and coastal Georgetown

* storm information:
    - about 290 miles south of Wilmington NC or about 260 miles
      south-southeast of Myrtle Beach SC
    - 30.0n 78.0w
    - storm intensity 35 mph
    - movement northwest or 305 degrees at 14 mph

Situation overview
------------------

Tropical Depression Two... located about 260 miles south-southeast of Myrtle
Beach... is forecast to briefly strengthen into a weak tropical storm
early Sunday as it approaches the South Carolina coast near
Charleston. The tropical system is expected to turn to the northeast
on Sunday and slowly move up the Carolina coastline through Wednesday.

Rainfall is expected to produce the most significant impacts from this
system, as an average of 1 to 3 inches is forecast to fall between
Saturday afternoon and Sunday night across northeast South Carolina
and southeast North Carolina. A few locations may receive as much as
4 inches of rain.

Sustained winds of 30 mph with gusts of 40 to 50 mph are expected to
spread across Georgetown County on Sunday, and potentially into
southern Horry County as well. Elsewhere across northeastern
South Carolina, winds will range from 10 to 20 mph, with gusts to
30 mph along the coast. Significant impacts from wind are less
likely across southeast North Carolina.

Rough surf and an increased danger of strong rip currents can be
expected beginning late Saturday afternoon and continuing through
Sunday along the entire coast from Georgetown County northward to
Pender County.

Potential impacts
-----------------

* flooding rain:
protect against locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible
limited impacts across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina. Potential impacts include:
    - localized flooding from rainfall may occur, especially in
      low-lying and poor drainage areas. Some rivers and creeks may
      rise as a result of the rain. Small streams, creeks, and
      ditches may overflow in some locations.
    - Several storm drains and retention ponds may become full and
      begin to overflow. Some brief Road closures are possible.

* Wind:
protect against hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across
southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina. Potential
impacts include:
    - damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored
      Mobile homes is possible. Unsecured lightweight objects may be
      blown about.
    - Some large limbs may break from trees. A few shallow rooted or
      weak trees may snap or be knocked down. Some fences and roadway
      signs damaged.
    - A few roads may become impassable due to debris, particularly
      within urban or heavily wooded locations. Hazardous driving
      conditions are possible, especially for high profile vehicles
      on bridges and other elevated roadways.
    - Scattered power and communications outages are possible.

* Other coastal hazards:
    -rough surf will develop along the northeast South Carolina coast
     by late Saturday afternoon and will spread to the coast of
     southeast North Carolina by Sunday. There will be an increasing
     danger of strong rip currents beginning Saturday afternoon and
     continuing through Sunday for all area beaches.

* Surge:
protect against locally hazardous surge having possible limited
impacts across northeast South Carolina. Potential impacts in
this area include:
    - localized inundation and minor over-wash is possible, mainly
      along immediate shorelines and other vulnerable low-lying areas
      along the coast. Low spots along waterways and tidal creeks may
      also be impacted.
    - Some portions of near-shore roads and parking lots may become
      covered by surge water. Driving conditions may become hazardous
      in places where the surge covers the Road.
    - Minor to moderate beach erosion is possible, mainly in vulnerable
      locations along the ocean front.
    - Minor damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers is
      possible. A few small craft may break away from moorings if not
      properly secured.
    - Navigation may be difficult near inlets and waterways, as
      navigational aids may be off station or missing.

Elsewhere across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina, little to no impact is anticipated.

Precautionary/preparedness actions
----------------------------------

* other preparedness information:
now is the time to bring to completion all preparations to protect
life and property in accordance with your emergency plan.

Outside preparations should be wrapped up as soon as possible before
weather conditions deteriorate.

Always heed the advice of local officials and comply with any
orders that are issued. Remember, during the storm 9 1 1 emergency
services may not be able to immediately respond if conditions are
unsafe. This should be a big factor in your decision making.

Check-in with your emergency points of contact among family, friends,
and workmates. Inform them of your status and well-being. Let them
know how you intend to ride out the storm and when you plan to
check-in again.

In emergencies it is best to remain calm. Stay informed and focused
on the situation at hand. Exercise patience with those you encounter.
Be a good samaritan and helpful to others.

If you are a visitor and still in the area, listen for the name of
the city or town in which you are staying within local news updates.
Be sure you know the name of the County or Parish in which it
resides. Pay attention for instructions from local authorities.

Closely monitor NOAA Weather Radio or other local news outlets for
official storm information. Be ready to adapt to possible changes to
the forecast.

* Additional sources of information:
- for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov
- for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org
- for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org

Next update
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in Wilmington NC around 12 PM EDT, or sooner if conditions
warrant.


Kreitner


855 am EDT Sat may 28 2016

This product covers southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina

**tropical depression two will approach the South Carolina coast today
and may briefly strengthen to a weak tropical storm**

New information
---------------

* changes to watches and warnings:
    - none

* current watches and warnings:
    - a Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect for inland
      Horry... coastal Horry... inland Georgetown and coastal Georgetown

* storm information:
    - about 290 miles south of Wilmington NC or about 260 miles
      south-southeast of Myrtle Beach SC
    - 30.0n 78.0w
    - storm intensity 35 mph
    - movement northwest or 305 degrees at 14 mph

Situation overview
------------------

Tropical Depression Two... located about 260 miles south-southeast of Myrtle
Beach... is forecast to briefly strengthen into a weak tropical storm
early Sunday as it approaches the South Carolina coast near
Charleston. The tropical system is expected to turn to the northeast
on Sunday and slowly move up the Carolina coastline through Wednesday.

Rainfall is expected to produce the most significant impacts from this
system, as an average of 1 to 3 inches is forecast to fall between
Saturday afternoon and Sunday night across northeast South Carolina
and southeast North Carolina. A few locations may receive as much as
4 inches of rain.

Sustained winds of 30 mph with gusts of 40 to 50 mph are expected to
spread across Georgetown County on Sunday, and potentially into
southern Horry County as well. Elsewhere across northeastern
South Carolina, winds will range from 10 to 20 mph, with gusts to
30 mph along the coast. Significant impacts from wind are less
likely across southeast North Carolina.

Rough surf and an increased danger of strong rip currents can be
expected beginning late Saturday afternoon and continuing through
Sunday along the entire coast from Georgetown County northward to
Pender County.

Potential impacts
-----------------

* flooding rain:
protect against locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible
limited impacts across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina. Potential impacts include:
    - localized flooding from rainfall may occur, especially in
      low-lying and poor drainage areas. Some rivers and creeks may
      rise as a result of the rain. Small streams, creeks, and
      ditches may overflow in some locations.
    - Several storm drains and retention ponds may become full and
      begin to overflow. Some brief Road closures are possible.

* Wind:
protect against hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across
southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina. Potential
impacts include:
    - damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored
      Mobile homes is possible. Unsecured lightweight objects may be
      blown about.
    - Some large limbs may break from trees. A few shallow rooted or
      weak trees may snap or be knocked down. Some fences and roadway
      signs damaged.
    - A few roads may become impassable due to debris, particularly
      within urban or heavily wooded locations. Hazardous driving
      conditions are possible, especially for high profile vehicles
      on bridges and other elevated roadways.
    - Scattered power and communications outages are possible.

* Other coastal hazards:
    -rough surf will develop along the northeast South Carolina coast
     by late Saturday afternoon and will spread to the coast of
     southeast North Carolina by Sunday. There will be an increasing
     danger of strong rip currents beginning Saturday afternoon and
     continuing through Sunday for all area beaches.

* Surge:
protect against locally hazardous surge having possible limited
impacts across northeast South Carolina. Potential impacts in
this area include:
    - localized inundation and minor over-wash is possible, mainly
      along immediate shorelines and other vulnerable low-lying areas
      along the coast. Low spots along waterways and tidal creeks may
      also be impacted.
    - Some portions of near-shore roads and parking lots may become
      covered by surge water. Driving conditions may become hazardous
      in places where the surge covers the Road.
    - Minor to moderate beach erosion is possible, mainly in vulnerable
      locations along the ocean front.
    - Minor damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers is
      possible. A few small craft may break away from moorings if not
      properly secured.
    - Navigation may be difficult near inlets and waterways, as
      navigational aids may be off station or missing.

Elsewhere across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina, little to no impact is anticipated.

Precautionary/preparedness actions
----------------------------------

* other preparedness information:
now is the time to bring to completion all preparations to protect
life and property in accordance with your emergency plan.

Outside preparations should be wrapped up as soon as possible before
weather conditions deteriorate.

Always heed the advice of local officials and comply with any
orders that are issued. Remember, during the storm 9 1 1 emergency
services may not be able to immediately respond if conditions are
unsafe. This should be a big factor in your decision making.

Check-in with your emergency points of contact among family, friends,
and workmates. Inform them of your status and well-being. Let them
know how you intend to ride out the storm and when you plan to
check-in again.

In emergencies it is best to remain calm. Stay informed and focused
on the situation at hand. Exercise patience with those you encounter.
Be a good samaritan and helpful to others.

If you are a visitor and still in the area, listen for the name of
the city or town in which you are staying within local news updates.
Be sure you know the name of the County or Parish in which it
resides. Pay attention for instructions from local authorities.

Closely monitor NOAA Weather Radio or other local news outlets for
official storm information. Be ready to adapt to possible changes to
the forecast.

* Additional sources of information:
- for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov
- for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org
- for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org

Next update
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in Wilmington NC around 12 PM EDT, or sooner if conditions
warrant.


Kreitner

855 am EDT Sat may 28 2016

This product covers southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina

**tropical depression two will approach the South Carolina coast today
and may briefly strengthen to a weak tropical storm**

New information
---------------

* changes to watches and warnings:
    - none

* current watches and warnings:
    - a Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect for inland
      Horry... coastal Horry... inland Georgetown and coastal Georgetown

* storm information:
    - about 290 miles south of Wilmington NC or about 260 miles
      south-southeast of Myrtle Beach SC
    - 30.0n 78.0w
    - storm intensity 35 mph
    - movement northwest or 305 degrees at 14 mph

Situation overview
------------------

Tropical Depression Two... located about 260 miles south-southeast of Myrtle
Beach... is forecast to briefly strengthen into a weak tropical storm
early Sunday as it approaches the South Carolina coast near
Charleston. The tropical system is expected to turn to the northeast
on Sunday and slowly move up the Carolina coastline through Wednesday.

Rainfall is expected to produce the most significant impacts from this
system, as an average of 1 to 3 inches is forecast to fall between
Saturday afternoon and Sunday night across northeast South Carolina
and southeast North Carolina. A few locations may receive as much as
4 inches of rain.

Sustained winds of 30 mph with gusts of 40 to 50 mph are expected to
spread across Georgetown County on Sunday, and potentially into
southern Horry County as well. Elsewhere across northeastern
South Carolina, winds will range from 10 to 20 mph, with gusts to
30 mph along the coast. Significant impacts from wind are less
likely across southeast North Carolina.

Rough surf and an increased danger of strong rip currents can be
expected beginning late Saturday afternoon and continuing through
Sunday along the entire coast from Georgetown County northward to
Pender County.

Potential impacts
-----------------

* flooding rain:
protect against locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible
limited impacts across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina. Potential impacts include:
    - localized flooding from rainfall may occur, especially in
      low-lying and poor drainage areas. Some rivers and creeks may
      rise as a result of the rain. Small streams, creeks, and
      ditches may overflow in some locations.
    - Several storm drains and retention ponds may become full and
      begin to overflow. Some brief Road closures are possible.

* Wind:
protect against hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across
southeast North Carolina and northeast South Carolina. Potential
impacts include:
    - damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored
      Mobile homes is possible. Unsecured lightweight objects may be
      blown about.
    - Some large limbs may break from trees. A few shallow rooted or
      weak trees may snap or be knocked down. Some fences and roadway
      signs damaged.
    - A few roads may become impassable due to debris, particularly
      within urban or heavily wooded locations. Hazardous driving
      conditions are possible, especially for high profile vehicles
      on bridges and other elevated roadways.
    - Scattered power and communications outages are possible.

* Other coastal hazards:
    -rough surf will develop along the northeast South Carolina coast
     by late Saturday afternoon and will spread to the coast of
     southeast North Carolina by Sunday. There will be an increasing
     danger of strong rip currents beginning Saturday afternoon and
     continuing through Sunday for all area beaches.

* Surge:
protect against locally hazardous surge having possible limited
impacts across northeast South Carolina. Potential impacts in
this area include:
    - localized inundation and minor over-wash is possible, mainly
      along immediate shorelines and other vulnerable low-lying areas
      along the coast. Low spots along waterways and tidal creeks may
      also be impacted.
    - Some portions of near-shore roads and parking lots may become
      covered by surge water. Driving conditions may become hazardous
      in places where the surge covers the Road.
    - Minor to moderate beach erosion is possible, mainly in vulnerable
      locations along the ocean front.
    - Minor damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers is
      possible. A few small craft may break away from moorings if not
      properly secured.
    - Navigation may be difficult near inlets and waterways, as
      navigational aids may be off station or missing.

Elsewhere across southeast North Carolina and northeast South
Carolina, little to no impact is anticipated.

Precautionary/preparedness actions
----------------------------------

* other preparedness information:
now is the time to bring to completion all preparations to protect
life and property in accordance with your emergency plan.

Outside preparations should be wrapped up as soon as possible before
weather conditions deteriorate.

Always heed the advice of local officials and comply with any
orders that are issued. Remember, during the storm 9 1 1 emergency
services may not be able to immediately respond if conditions are
unsafe. This should be a big factor in your decision making.

Check-in with your emergency points of contact among family, friends,
and workmates. Inform them of your status and well-being. Let them
know how you intend to ride out the storm and when you plan to
check-in again.

In emergencies it is best to remain calm. Stay informed and focused
on the situation at hand. Exercise patience with those you encounter.
Be a good samaritan and helpful to others.

If you are a visitor and still in the area, listen for the name of
the city or town in which you are staying within local news updates.
Be sure you know the name of the County or Parish in which it
resides. Pay attention for instructions from local authorities.

Closely monitor NOAA Weather Radio or other local news outlets for
official storm information. Be ready to adapt to possible changes to
the forecast.

* Additional sources of information:
- for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov
- for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org
- for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org

Next update
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in Wilmington NC around 12 PM EDT, or sooner if conditions
warrant.


Kreitner

Weather Severe Map
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Puerto Rico - Flood Watch, Areal Flood Advisory
Rhode Island - Air Quality Alert , Record Report
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Texas - Flood Warning , Coastal Hazard Statement , Record Report , Public Information Statement
Utah - Record Report , Public Information Statement
Vermont - Record Report , Public Information Statement
Wisconsin - Severe Thunderstorm Watch , Severe Thunderstorm Watch , Special Statement , Public Information Statement
Wyoming - Flood Warning , Record Report

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